Marty’s Bipolar Trek

I have survived being Bipolar for more than seven decades.  I have a burning desire to share my journey, and give a close and personal view of what it has been like, both mentally and emotionally, and to still have my boots on the ground.

I had  my first major episode when I was 28 , but was not officially diagnosed until my mid forties. I am sure my doctors along the way knew, they just failed to inform me.  I came to this conclusion because of the medications I was given over the years.

I believe I am Bipolar because of a chemical imbalance and the way my brain is wired. There are two events in my life that may have been a factor in programing me for being Bipolar.  I am pretty sure my mom had a high doses of mercury in her system when she was carrying me.  She worked for a dentist who used it when mixing silver fillings back in the 30’s and 40’s.  He squeezed the mercury out of the silver  mixture using a cotton cloth by hand.  I remember he  had tremors when he worked on my teeth as a child.  I was exposed to mercury during those visits, for sure.  The second event  that might have impacted my becoming Bipolar  was the directions my pediatrician  gave my parents on how to parent.  He directed them to only hold me when I was being fed or having my diaper changed, and to feed me by the clock every four hours. I believe there is a connection.  I was also bullied by my mother during my formative years.

There is also a history of alcoholism and compulsive behavior on one side of my family.  I am also dyslexic, which runs on the other side of my family.  Is it connected?  Could be.

A goal in blogging is to discuss subjects on  manic episodes, depression, isolation, education or lack of it on mental disorders, and suicide  I want to share my personal experiences and  views on medications, both prescriptions and natural.  I want to talk about  the positive sides of being Bipolar and how I have learned to manage my condition.  I also want to write about current events through my lens.

My blog will never suggest any treatment for anyone else.  I only want to share my journey and share what has worked and has not worked for me.  I believe everyone who suffers any kind of mental illness is unique.  I am not a cookie cutters example of being Bipolar.  I do believe there are similarities to others who are also Bipolar.

If I had to sum up in one sentence how my experiences of being Bipolar has felt,  it would be,  I have no filter on my emotions.

I am much more than this disorder. Here is a brief history of where I have been and what I have done.

I have lived in three states, TX, CA, and WA, where I now reside.  My travels   included 8 different cities and 15 different homes.  I am a mother, Grandmother and Great Grandma.

My work experience has been varied, partly due to my many homes.  I was a window and interior designer of displays in a large department store back when outside window displays were in fashion, long before malls were the norm.  I managed a dental office.  I worked as and outside sales person for an office supply firm, covering four cities, and later became the stores purchasing  agent for the supplies they sold.

I married and retired in 1985.  A couple of years later I was pulled back into the working force by my interest in crafts, quilting, fiber arts and design.  I had a working knowledge of about every known craft available in the USA.  I was asked to develop and manage a teaching program for a popular arts and craft store.  I also ended up teaching many of the classes.

My favorite charity, The Linus Project, involves quilting.  They provide quilts and blankets to children in hospitals between the ages of birth and 18 years old.  It is a nationwide organization.  Since 1985 I have made over 300 quilts for both family and charities.

Besides being a new blogger I am knee-deep in making albums for family members and diving into genealogy.

Here are some of my favorite sayings.

WHAT DOESN’T KILL YOU MAKES YOU STRONGER, and

NO MATTER WHERE YOU GO, THERE YOU ARE.

LIFE DOESN’T COME WITH AN ELEVATOR, YOU HAVE TO CLIMB THE STAIRS ONE AT A TIME.

Advertisements

One Response to Marty’s Bipolar Trek

  1. atridim says:

    Hi Marty,
    Your trek to combat bipolar disorder is outstanding. Steps are fine. By my count you have already registered over 3300 big steps. Its not how far you go…its the progress you make!

    Light lifts the spirit. Its one of the plusses one gets during a daytime walk. The light illuminates many great treasures that our eyes see during a walk. Those sights provide peace to the brain.
    A SunRay lamp provides light, including UV rays that facilitate skin cancer. It is not a substitute for the mental benefits realized from a walk illuminated by the light of day.

    Understanding the difficulties you experience with your knees, I want to share with you a story of a lady that I have seen walking past my house almost every day for several years…using her walker. One day while getting the mail I talked with her. She told me she had two bad knees and two bad hips. I asked ‘so why do you walk? She told me that walking gave her a peace of mind, even though it hurt badly.

    I hope you will soon be able to continue your trek…even if it means using a walker, cane or crutches. When you convince your mind to continue your trek, I would like you to measure some data that will be useful in monitoring your trek progress. Tell me how many steps it takes you to walk a measurable distance. The easiest way to do this is to measure the segment lengths on a sidewalk along a street, usually about 60″. Walk the distance of 10 segments, counting the number of steps you take. Report the individual segment length and the number of steps taken to walk that distance. The data you present will become the basis for your trek.
    Captain Rick

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s